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Now displaying: October, 2017
Oct 25, 2017

Amanda and Jenn discuss '80s sci-fi, family drama, working class classics, and more in this week's episode of Get Booked.

This episode is sponsored by Libby from OverDrive and Penguin Random House Audio.

 

Questions

 

1. Hello!

This year, I’ve really been interested in seasonal reading. I find this super easy during Halloween but as I prep my TBR pile for November and December, I’m coming up short.

I typically read YA and am looking for holiday reads that are inclusive of traditions and people. It seems that the options are fairly small in this regard so I’d be happy with books that just set a cozy/winter scene but also feature diverse characters.

Thank you!
--Caitlin

 

2. Hello again ladies! My group, Geek Girls, is doing an all 80s theme in the month of November so we are hoping to pick a scifi or fantasy book from the 80s for the book club. Any suggestions? Only stipulation, they must be available on audio. Happy Halloween!
-Jeanne

 

3. Hi Amanda and Jenn!

I just booked my dream trip to Stockholm and Copenhagen! I really want to read something set in these cities, but everything seems to be a crime thriller (great, but not always) or about 120 years old and written by Serious Old Men. Can you please recommend something set in one of these cities that doesn't fall in one of those two camps? For reference, some of my favourites are Middlesex by Jeffrey Eugenides, Pachinko by Min Jin Lee, Saints for All Occasions by J. Courtney Sullivan, and The Great Gatsby. So, if you know of any fun Scandinavian family sagas, please help me!!!

Thank you!
--Olivia

 

4. Hi Get Booked! I am a non-binary person and can never find books featuring characters that share that aspect of my identity. I'm not interested in reading books *about* being non-binary, but I would like to read about non-binary characters doing other stuff! I'm open to most genres -- no horror or gory crime stuff please! I'm also not big on biography/memoir, though don't seem to mind it when in graphic novel form or when it reads like fiction. I also can't get through really dense, long books. Thank you!
--Frances

 

5. Hello ladies! I love the podcast and have gotten many great recs for my TBR from you all. After the garbage fire that was the 2016 election, I am feeling the need to better inform myself on some key issues. One that I am particularly interested in is immigration. I have read The Book Of Unknown Americans and Americanah, both of which were life-changing reads. I would like to read some non-fiction on this subject, especially as it relates to American immigration policies.

Thanks for all your great work.
--Heidi

 

6. I just discovered your podcast and really enjoyed it, it's great getting all the recommendation, I've added a lot to my TBR pile. I'm looking for some books that are like the prime time soaps from the 80's like Dallas and Dynasty, focusing on family and full of intrigue.
Thanks,
--Melissa

 

7. Hi,

I recently finished reading North and South by Elizabeth Gaskell, which I loved. It made me realise how fed up I am with reading about the English gentry and aristocracy. I am also really bored with books set in London and the Home Counties. I live in a post-industrial town called Chesterfield and want to read about towns like mine and the people that lived in them. I am looking for relatively unknown classics (I have read most of the famous English classics) or historical fiction novels set in towns and cities in the North of England about ordinary, working class people. I am primarily looking for books set in the 18th and 19th centuries.

Cheers.
--Amy

 

 

Books Discussed

Bookstore giveaway! bookriot.com/bookstoregiveaway

Future Home of the Living God by Louise Erdrich

SPQR by Mary Beard

Dreidels on the Brain by Joel Ben Izzy

My True Love Gave To Me edited by Stephanie Perkins

Alanna by Tamora Pierce

Dawn by Octavia Butler

Number the Stars by Lois Lowry

My Dirty Little Book of Stolen Time by Liz Jensen

Lizard Radio by Pat Schmatz

Uncovering Ray by Edie Danford

Undocumented by Aviva Chomsky

In The Country We Love by Diane Guerrero

Land of Love and Drowning by Tiphanie Yanique

The Family Hightower by Brian Francis Slattery

The Mill on the Floss by George Eliot

David Peace

Oct 18, 2017

Amanda and Jenn discuss grown-up American Girl stories, soft sci-fi, LGBTQ romance, and more in this week's episode of Get Booked.

This episode is sponsored by What Counts As Love by Marian Crotty and 36 Questions That Changed My Mind About You by Vicki Grant.

 

 

Questions

1. Hi,
I have just finished the latest installment of the Throne of Glass series and have read everything by Sarah J Maas, I also love most of the whole dystopian YA female lead genre ( loved the Cinder series, all the Grisha books, Red Queen, Graceling etc.) I am 20 and would read a big range of books from pretty much any genre was wondering if you had any recommendations for similar books that aren't necessarily YA ( or are I'll read anything!). A series of an author who has a lot of books of a similar type would be brilliant as once I find something I love I devour it !!
Love the podcast and thank you for your help,
--Holly

 

2. Hi ladies!

When doing some cleaning, I found dozens of American Girl doll books and I was struck with nostalgia. I LOVED these books growing up - I still attribute these books with my deep love of history. As I was holding these books lovingly, I immediately thought to ask you two if you had any recommendations for "grown up" American Girl doll books. Any suggestions for historical fiction featuring strong and spunky female characters?

Thanks, love the show!
--Chelsea

 

3. Hi Amanda and Jenn,

Listening to the Book Riot podcasts has increased the number of books on my TBR pile steadily for the past couple of months, thanks for all the great recommendations!

What I'd like to ask you: I've read Mary Doria Russell's The Sparrow this year, and I loved it. I also read both of Becky Chambers' Wayfarers books and I loved them as well. Do you have any recommendations for soft sci-fi books?

Thanks!
--Jill (from Belgium)

 

4. Hello Amanda and Jenn,

First of all, I love your podcast and have discovered many books and authors because of it. You guys both do an amazing job! My recommendation request is for my 7 year-old son. He recently read Ghosts by Raina Telgemeier (thanks to your recommendation from a previous episode) and then made his way through the rest of her work with Sisters, Smile, and Drama. He's read all four of these books over the course of the last week and I would like to find some read-alikes, preferably that are part of a series, for him to read next. He has read all of the books in the Diary of a Wimpy Kid series, Captain Underpants series, and several of the Big Nate books. Thank you in advance and keep up the awesome work!

--Angela

 

5. Hi!

I'm looking for some sweet romance to dive into. I'm not much for the genre, but sometimes you just need something to squeal about. Preferably something lgbtqai - though not so much about coming out or such as a major plot detail. Something light but sweet and if the couple are non male that would also be a huge plus! Thanks!
--Sonja

 

6. Amanda & Jenn,

First off, I love the podcast! Thank you for all the great recommendations. I've written in a few times with requests, so sorry if you keep seeing my name pop up!

This time I'm writing requesting recommendations for my 15 year old son. He is a rather reluctant reader but very much enjoys listening to audiobooks when we take road trips. If we don't finish the audiobook in the car he asks me to buy it for him to finish in book form. He mostly likes dystopian novels, preferably with some type of corrupt government. He's enjoyed 1984, A Clockwork Orange, Fahrenheit 451 & Ready Player One. Not in that theme he read & enjoyed The Outsiders. His book suggestions mostly come from what his friends are reading in school. I've tried a few times to pick up books I thought he would like but haven't been able to find anything he got in to. I tried The Maze Runner, The 5th Wave & I can't remember what else. Any suggestions?

Thank you!
--Valerie

 

7.I am not a "classics" reader (I didn't love Jane Eyre. I know -Who am I?!)

I did like The Awakening by Kate Chopin. Can you recommend another classic or semi-classic to read next?
--Andrea

 

Books Discussed

Giveaway! bookriot.com/bookstoregiveaway

The Four Tendencies by Gretchen Rubin

Of Mess and Moxie by Jen Hatmaker

The Tiger’s Daughter by K. Arsenault Rivera

The Fifth Season by NK Jemisin

Moon Called by Patricia Briggs

An Extraordinary Union by Alyssa Cole

Kopp Sisters books by Amy Stewart (Girl Waits With Gun)

The Wanderers by Meg Howrey

Provenance by Ann Leckie

Eerie Elementary series by Jack Chabert (The School Is Alive)

Chronicles of Claudette by Jorge Aguirre and Rafael Rosado (Giants Beware)

Georgia Peaches and Other Forbidden Fruit by Jaye Robin Brown

Out on Good Behavior by Dahlia Adler

Want by Cindy Pon

Brave New World by Aldous Huxley

Warcross by Marie Lu

Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf

The Living is Easy by Dorothy West

Oct 11, 2017

Amanda and Jenn discuss inclusive horror, small-town fantasies, smart creepy girls, and more in this week's episode of Get Booked.

This episode is sponsored by The Bloodprint by Ausma Zehanat Khan and All The Crooked Saints by Maggie Stiefvater.

 

Questions

1. Hi guys,

I’m a big horror/thriller fan and I’m looking to include more diverse authors and protagonists in my reading. Most recently I read and loved Lovecraft Country in which a Black community comes together to battle eldritch horrors. I like Joe Hill, Shirley Jackson, Jack Ketchum, novels or short stories, and both supernatural or more reality based stories as long as there’s a scary/spooky atmosphere. Can you recommend some horror authors who are people of color, LGBT or from a religious minority? Or horror books that have a non-white, non-straight protagonist?

thanks so much! love the podcast even though you make my TBR pile teeter with all the books I add after hearing of them from you.
--Vanessa

 

2. I just binge watched Twin Peaks and loved it. I'm a sucker for small town drama with mystical elements, and was wondering if you guys had any book recs similar to that. I found some lists online that were mainly comprised of thrillers like Gone Girl, which isn't really my thing. Somebody recommended American Gods to me, and I can see why. I've already read it, and liked it very much, but don't feel like rereading it. Any other suggestions?
(Note: I've already read everything written by Neil Gaiman)
--Diane

 

3. Hi Amanda and Jenn!

I am seeking book recommendations for my mom who recently retired from a career in early childhood care. As she has not been able to dive into books without crayon marks in years and is unsure of where to start looking, I would like to offer her a number of suggestions from multiple areas -- short stories and fast-paced novels are especially welcome. She is not into horror or science fiction, but she's happy to try other genres.

Thank you so much!
--Laura

 

4. Hi ladies,

My boyfriend and I met online and immediately bonded over our shared love of books. We've spent countless weekends lounging around reading together in silence. He recently brought up the idea of reading books together and I am 1000% on board. My problem is: how do we choose? I have a 1000+ book "To Read" list on Goodreads and follow all the BookRiot podcasts; he loves to just wander into bookstores and pick up whatever catches his eye. We both enjoy sci-fi and fantasy but my tastes skew a bit more to the side of literary fiction (favorite book: The Sparrow) and he is inclined towards more epic, action-packed adventures (favorite book: anything from the Dark Tower series). I also love nonfiction, which he has never really gotten into despite his love of documentaries.

Do you have any recommendations for books that will satisfy us both? I'm thinking something by Terry Prachett or Neil Gaiman would be a good start but would love some more ideas.

Thank you!
--Ashley

 

5. Hi Ladies!

One of my favorite books of all time is We Have Always Lived In the Castle by Shirley Jackson. Also just recently I discovered the Flavia de Luce series and I'm enjoying it very much. My favorite aspect is that these books focus on creepy smart girls. Do you have any more recs that contain creepy smart girls as main characters? I prefer books on audio. Thanks ladies!
--Amanda

 

6. Hi there!

It seems like a majority of the contemporary novels I've read recently either take place in the Midwest or in New York or feature characters from the Midwest who have moved to New York. I enjoy these books, as they tend to feature multi-dimensional characters with rich stories but I grew up and still live in the DC/Maryland area and I would love to read a novel that takes place around here. The only thing is that I don't want to read a DC novel that features politicians or bureaucrats or political intrigue. The only one I know of so far is The Known World so anything else that you can recommend would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks!
--Aneesa

 

7. Having had a challenging time with my mental health at the beginning of the year, I have really struggled to get back into the physical act of reading (although have still been buying books, oops). I find audiobooks and podcasts easy to follow as it tends to be my focus that slips. However due to the pile of physical books I own, I am looking for some gateway easy to read books to get back into being a reader and not just a listener. I typically prefer fiction over non-fiction but like a wide range of genres and am willing to give anything a go (although I don't typically enjoy pure romance outside of YA). I do generally lean toward thrillers and mysteries, but think maybe the typically darker subject matter is part of the problem. Any recommendations would be great. Thank you very much for the podcast, your enthusiasm about the books you talk about has really encouraged and ignited my desire to start reading again.
--Megan

 

Books

Provenance by Ann Leckie

Shades of Milk and Honey by Mary Robinette Kowal

The Devil in Silver by Victor LaValle

Ghost Summer by Tananarive Due

Universal Harvester by John Darnielle

Midnight Crossroad by Charlaine Harris

The Underground Railroad by Colson Whitehead

Young Jane Young by Gabrielle Zevin

Kraken by China Miéville

An Unkindness of Ghosts by Rivers Solomon

Coraline by Neil Gaiman

Swamplandia! by Karen Russell (trigger warning: rape, suicide)

The Accidental Tourist by Anne Tyler

Song Yet Sung by James McBride

A Front Page Affair by Radha Vatsal (Kitty Weeks #1)

The Quiche of Death by MC Beaton (Agatha Raisin #1)

Oct 4, 2017

Amanda and Jenn discuss their favorite small press and translated titles in this week's special 100th episode of Get Booked!

This episode is sponsored by Because I Was a Girl, edited by Melissa de la Cruz, and 27 Hours by Tristina Wright from Entangled Teen.

 

Get Booked Bingo Card - enjoy!

Guillotine Press

The Queue by Basma Abdel Aziz (Melville House), translated by Elisabeth Jaquette

Citizen by Claudia Rankine (Graywolf)

Hadriana In All My Dreams by René Depestre (Akashic), translated by Kaiama L Glover

All In by Simona Ahrnstedt, translated by Tara Chace

Elysium by Jennifer Marie Brissett (Aqueduct Press)

The Hottest Dishes of the Tartar Cuisine by Alina Bronsky (Europa), translated by Tim Mohr

Slow Days, Fast Company by Eve Babitz (NYRB)

Fever Dream by Samanta Schweblin, translated Megan McDowell

Border by Kapka Kassabova (Graywolf)

Blood of the Dawn by Claudia Salazar Jiménez (Deep Vellum), translated Elizabeth Breyer - trigger warnings

A Murder in Time by Julie McElwain (Pegasus Books)

Beyond the Rice Fields by Naivo (Restless Books), translated Allison M. Charette

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